Testosterone Role in Injury and Recovery

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Testosterone decreases physical injuries, the severity of the injury, and can shorten the length of time that is necessary to completely recover from injury and surgery.

The most widely accepted and universally acknowledged effect of Testosterone is the anabolic (growth) effect testosterone has on muscle size and strength. This unique property of testosterone provides young men and women with a strong, agile, vital appearing body that we associate with youth. In fact, both muscle mass and testosterone peak in our twenties, and decrease in a parallel fashion. The loss of muscle mass in women after 40 and men after 50, is secondary to the loss of testosterone production, and the increase in Sex Hormone Binding Globulin, which inactivates testosterone.

So many of the characteristics we visually identify with aging from loss of muscle mass to sagging skin on the face to hunched shoulders and bent body posture are directly connected to the loss of testosterone production by the body as we age.

Fortunately, we have learned how to replace the testosterone that our bodies make in our youth with an identical substance that we can manufacture, bioidentical testosterone pellets..

Amazing things happen by Replacing our testosterone We improve our youthful presentation to the world but more importantly generate normal youthful muscle mass, strength, balance, bone strength, physical stamina for exercise. It does much more than that for our physical health: Testosterone decreases physical injuries, the severity of the injury, shortens the length of time that is necessary to completely recover from injury and surgery, when using optimal physical therapy and personal training.

It does seem that all older frail men and women should be evaluated for their testosterone levels and replaced before during and a short time after surgery to improve the response to postoperative physical therapy and physical training. I believe that would improve the individual outcomes of most people over 50 undergoing most surgeries, but especially joint replacements.

Brett Newcomb and I will discuss this and other aspects of testosterone and the aging process in this week’s healthcast.

This Health cast was written and presented by Dr. Kathy Maupin, M.D., Bio-identical Hormone Replacement Expert and Author, with Brett Newcomb, MA., LPC.,
Family Counselor, Presenter and Author. www.BioBalanceHealth.com.